Colloquium IS (November 2, 2018) – Design of a reference model-based approach to support business-IT alignment improvement in co-creation value networks

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday, November 2, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Samaneh Bagheri

Title: Design of a reference model-based approach to support business-IT alignment improvement in co-creation value networks

Abstract:

Over the past three decades, business-IT alignment (BITA) has resided among the top ten concerns of organizations worldwide. One of the primary challenges which confront organizations is that BITA is a moving target due to changes in the organization’s external and internal environments. Hence, BITA as a moving target should be improved continuously over time. However, achieving better BITA is difficult, and organizations encounter several problems such as communication flaws and a lack of shared domain knowledge among others.

Addressing BITA might even more challenging in a co-creation value network setting where heterogeneous actors collaborate to realize shared values through design and delivery of customized solution-oriented services. In such a setting, IT provides technical foundations for collaboration and information exchange among actors. This implies that BITA has to be addressed at a network level.

In this presentation, I will introduce a reference model-based approach to support BITA improvement process in a co-creation value network setting. I will explain the research process that has been followed to design this approach.

Colloquium IS (October 5, 2018) – Advanced dynamic resource allocation in BPM systems

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday, October 5, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Irene Vanderfeesten

Title: Advanced dynamic resource allocation in BPM systems

Abstract:

In this presentation I will outline my work in the area of Human Aspects of Business Information Systems Engineering (the focal area of my Associate Professor position), with special attention for the topic of advanced dynamic resource allocation. Business Process Management Systems (BPMSs) automatically execute business processes and coordinate work amongst resources. Humans execute tasks in these processes and interact with the BPMS through a task list. In most systems the mechanism to select and allocate the right resource to execute a task is fairly basic and only takes into account organizational information of a resource such as the position, department, business unit, etc. In this presentation I discuss more advanced ways of allocating resources using detailed information of the resources (such as experience, capabilities, preference, etc.) and cases. With some examples from the administrative domain I illustrate how process performance is improved through this. Currently, in the HORSE project, these mechanism are also extended for the manufacturing domain in which human and robotic resources collaborate on tasks or can be interchangeably allocated to execute a task. I will give you a flavor of these new developments and an outlook into the next steps.

Colloquium IS (September 7, 2018) – Factors that complicate selecting software requirements

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

September 7, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Hans Schoenmakers

Title: Factors that complicate selecting software requirements

Subtitle: Validating Factors from Literature in an Empirical Study

Abstract:

In market-driven software product development, new features may be added to the software, based on a collection of candidate requirements. Selecting requirements  however is difficult. Despite all work done on this problem, known as the next release problem, what is missing, is a comprehensive overview of the factors that complicate selecting software requirements. The research consists of a systematic literature review, searching for occurrences in the literature where a causal relation was suggested between certain conditions and the difficulty of selecting software requirements. Clustering the 156 findings, found by analyzing 544 papers, led to 33 complicating factors that were classified in eight groups. The complicating factors were validated in semi-structured interviews with twelve experts from three different industrial organizations. In these interviews both questions on experiences with the complicating factors and on why they were complicating were asked. The results aid in getting a better understanding of the complexity of selecting requirements.

 

 

Colloquium IS (July 6, 2018) – Discovering Anomalous Frequent Patterns from Event Logs

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

July 6, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: dr. Laura Genga

Title: Discovering Anomalous Frequent Patterns from Event Logs

Abstract:

Conformance checking allows organizations to compare process executions recorded by the IT system against a process model representing the normative behavior. Most of the existing techniques, however, are only able to pinpoint where individual process executions deviate from the normative behavior, without considering neither possible correlations among occurred deviations nor their frequency. Moreover, possible parallelisms among process activities are usually neglected,

which can lead to inaccurate diagnostics. In this talk, I will introduce an approach to extract anomalous frequent patterns from historical logging data. The extracted patterns can exhibit parallel behaviors and correlate recurrent deviations that have occurred in possibly different portions of the process, thus providing the analysts with a valuable aid in investigating nonconforming behaviors. The approach has been evaluated using both synthetic and real-life logs.

 

Colloquium IS (June 1, 2018) – EHR-data driven clinical risk prediction for CVD

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

June 1, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Zhengxing Huang from Zhejiang University

Title: EHR-data driven clinical risk prediction for CVD

Abstract:

With the rapid development of hospital information systems, a large volume of electronic health records (EHRs) has been produced, which provides a comprehensive source for clinical risk prediction. In this talk, I am concerned with the problem of utilizing the heterogeneous EHR data to assist clinical risk prediction for cardiovascular disease patients.  Specifically, two challenges are addressed in this study: 1) how to annotate unstructured EHR data for generating a benchmark dataset, and 2) how to train a predictive model on the benchmark patient samples which are typically imbalanced and correlated to each other.

Colloquium IS (May 4, 2018) – Managing variability in knowledge-intensive processes

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

May 4, 2018, 16:00 – 17:00 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Rik Eshuis

Title: Managing variability in knowledge-intensive processes

Abstract:

In modern organizations, the importance of knowledge workers and the knowledge-intensive processes (KiPs) they perform is ever increasing. Examples of KiPs are new product development processes, smart maintenance processes, diagnosing and treating patients etc. In a KiP a case is processed and evaluated based on human judgement of knowledge workers, who often rely on digitized information to apply their knowledge. Flexible BPM technologies like case management and business artifacts support KiPs. A KiP model typically needs to be adapted to the case being processed, leading to different but related variant models of a KiP. In this talk, I outline an approach based on business artifacts to manage variability in KiPs, in order to avoid rework and improve the quality of KiPs.

 

 

Colloquium IS (April 6, 2018) – Feeding Evolutionary Algorithm with Column Generation output

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

April 6, 2018, 12:30 – 13:30 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Murat Firat

Title: Feeding Evolutionary Algorithm with Column Generation output

Abstract:

Nowadays companies in telecommunication, logistics, and airport operations face large scale optimization problems.  These problems are usually scheduling and planning problems. Solving these problems to optimality can be exhaustive, even impossible due to the exponential size of their feasible solution sets. At this point, column generation comes to help by providing us good-quality lower bounds for the relaxations of Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) formulations.  In my talk, I will firstly mention the basics of the Column Generation, and secondly explain how the output of Column Generation method can be used as input for an Evolutionary Method.

Colloquium IS (March 2, 2018)

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

March 2, 2018, 12:30 – 13:30 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Estefania Serral Asensio

Title: Integrating BPM and IoT

Abstract:

Many researchers have already shown the numerous benefits that Internet of Things (IoT) can bring to the Business Process Management (BPM) field. However, few companies have done the transition from traditional BPs to IoT BPs. They lack the needed guidelines and tools to embrace this challenging BP redesign.

This presentation will give an overview of my recent and ongoing research on supporting the integration of IoT in BPM and will also introduce CAPN, a tool-supported formalism that allows the modelling and simulation of IoT BPs. This tool enables a more accurate and reliable simulation of such processes improving the way organizations can evaluate their To-Be processes before they are put into production. The contribution of CAPN is two-fold: 1) it allows IoT BPs to be simulated and 2) it improves BPs simulation by enabling the consideration of all levels of context.

Colloquium IS (February 2, 2018)

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

February 2, 2018, 12:30 – 13:30 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Maryam Razavian

Title: Empirical Research Design for Software Architecture Decision Making:
An Analysis

Abstract: Software architecture decision making involves humans, their behavioral issues and practice. As such, research on decision making needs to involve not only engineering but social science research methods. Despite past empirical research in software architecture decision making, we have not systematically studied how to perform such empirical research.

This talk is about the research methods have been used to study human decision making in software architecture. We analyzed research papers from our literature review on software architecture decision making. We classified the papers according to different facets of empirical research design like research logic, research purpose, research methodology and process. We derive lessons learned from existing studies and discuss open research issues inspired by social science research. We found predominant choices for the strategic research design and a variety of tactical design, operational design and study foci. We therefore introduce the focus matrix and the decision making research cycle to help researchers to position their research clearly. Thereby we provide a retrospective for the community and an entry point for new researchers to design empirical studies that embrace the human role in decision making.

 

Colloquium IS (November 3, 2017) – Interplay between learning and optimization

Dear all,

We are pleased to invite you to our next Colloquium IS that will take place on Friday,

November 3, 2017, 12:30 – 13:30 (Paviljoen K.16).

Speaker: Yingqian Zhang

Title: Interplay between learning and optimization

Abstract:

There are increasing interests in combining machine learning and optimization. In this talk, I will introduce two ongoing work in this research line.

In most existing approaches of using data to solve optimization problems, predictive (machine learning) models serve as decision variables, input parameters, or solution evaluation functions. In our work, we show how to use the internal structure of predictive models in optimization process, and demonstrate how the proposed approach helps to find better solutions.

Predictive models such as decision trees are typically built using sub-optimal algorithms, which often aim at optimizing loss functions (i.e., accuracy). These algorithms are not flexible when a different learning objective rather than accuracy is desired. We propose to transfer the decision tree learning problem to a mathematical optimization problem. In this way, different learning objectives, such as minimizing discrimination or false positive errors, can be easily specified for constructing optimal predictive models.

I will use online auction as an example to illustrate both approaches.