Guest Speaker in the BPM Cluster (11 Nov): Dr. Bill Curtis

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Guest Speaker in the BPM Cluster (11 Nov): Dr. Bill Curtis

We are pleased to invite you to our next BPM Cluster Meeting that will take place on Friday, Nov.11, 2016 — 12:30 – 13:30. 

Our guest speaker is Dr. Bill Curtis –  an eminent software and organizational scientist.
Please find below the details about Dr. Curtis and his talk.

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DateFriday, November 11th, 12.30 – 13.30
Location:  Auditorium 2 (https://goo.gl/maps/12vWpRU21hx). Eindhoven University of Technology, Building: Auditorium, Room: 1.02, 5612 Eindhoven.
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SpeakerDr. Bill Curtis
TitleBusiness Process Maturity, Improvement, and Technology
Abstract:
Implementers of business process re-engineering, process improvement, and process technology too often make incorrect assumptions about their organizations.  First, they assume the organization has a business process.  Second, they assume there is one such process, rather than many.  When viewed from a process maturity perspective both of these assumptions are frequently wrong.  To avoid pitfalls that have caused as many as 70% of re-engineering and improvement programs to underperform, process re-engineering, improvement, and technology must be matched to the process maturity of the organization.  The Business Process Maturity Model (BPMM), an international standard of the Object Management Group (OMG), will be described from an organizational development and improvement perspective.  The characteristics of each maturity level explain many of the lessons that process improvement programs such as Six Sigma have had to learn to be successful, as well as why many implementations of process re-engineering and technology did not achieve their promised benefits.  These observations will illustrate with industrial examples, and will suggest one path for integrating IT with organizational science.

Bio:
bill curtisDr. Bill Curtis is best known for leading the development of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and People CMM while directing the Software Process Program in the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. CMM has become the global standard for evaluating the capability of organizations developing software. He later led the development of the Business Process Maturity Model (BPMM), now an OMG standard. Dr. Bill Curtis is currently SVP and Chief Scientist with CAST, which markets software analysis and measurement technology, where he heads CAST Research Labs.  He is also the Executive Director of the Consortium for IT Software Quality, a special interest group associated with the Object Management Group (OMG) chartered to produce international standards for measuring the size and quality of software from source code analysis. He has worked at GE Space Division, ITT, MCC, and co-founded a CMM-consultancy, TeraQuest, which was sold to Borland in 2005.  He taught behavioral statistics and conducted research on organizational leadership and sports psychology while in the Organizational Research Unit at the University of Washington.  He has published 4 books, over 150 papers, and is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for his contributions to software process improvement and measurement.

–>> Follow this link for the presentation file.

BPM cluster meeting (18 Oct): Presentation by Rob Kusters

On Tuesday October 18th, Rob Kusters will give a presentation with the following topic:

Title: Risks and problems on the intersection of Agile and traditional development methods in hybrid organizations
Abstract:
This research aims to identify the risks and problems experienced in the alignment and collaboration between Agile and traditional development methods within hybrid organizations. A literature search was executed looking at evidence from combinations of Agile, traditional development methods and hybrid organizations. The analysis focuses on risks, problems and challenges to scope the research area. Classification workshops were used to group the results from literature into a coherent whole. The result was tested in a single embedded case study.