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AGG.vdi
Description: In this paper, we focus on the Conference Scheduling System, a case study at the Tool Contest of Graph-Based Tools (GraBaTs) 2008. We took part in the contest with our graph transformation tool AGG and the Eclipse-based EMF model transformation tool EMF Tiger. We present the features of both tools and evaluate their abilities to model the Conference Scheduling System and to deal with additional contest assignments like model instance generation, property verification, and interoperability.
GraBaTs08
EMT.vdi
Description: In this paper, we focus on the Conference Scheduling System, a case study at the Tool Contest of Graph-Based Tools (GraBaTs) 2008. We took part in the contest with our graph transformation tool AGG and the Eclipse-based EMF model transformation tool EMF Tiger. We present the features of both tools and evaluate their abilities to model the Conference Scheduling System and to deal with additional contest assignments like model instance generation, property verification, and interoperability.
GraBaTs08
GrGen.NET.vdi
Description: GrGen.NET is a generative programming system for graph rewriting, transforming intuitive and expressive rewrite rule specifications into highly efficient .NET code. The user is supported by a convenient environment consisting of a graph viewer, an interactive shell with integrated debugging support, and an elegant domain-specific language for the combination of rewrite rules. After rapid prototyping with these tools, the resulting graph transformation programmes can be easily integrated into arbitrary .NET applications to serve as the algorithmic kernel. Expressiveness, convenience, and speed are exemplified by GrGen-solutions to the case studies AntWorld, Refactoring, and Conference Scheduling—besides others.
GraBaTs08
Kermeta.vdi
Description: Kermeta is a meta-language for specifying the structure and behavior of graphs of interconnected objects called models. In this paper, we show that Kermeta is relatively suitable for solving three graph-based problems. First, Kermeta allows the specification of generic model transformations such as refactorings that we apply to different metamodels including Ecore, Java, and Uml. Second, we demonstrate the extensibility of Kermeta to the formal language Alloy using an inter-language model transformation. Kermeta uses Alloy to generate recommendations for completing partially specified models. Third, we show that the Kermeta compiler achieves better execution time and memory performance compared to similar graph-based approaches using a common case study. The three solutions proposed for those graph-based problems and their evaluation with Kermeta according to the criteria of genericity, extensibility, and performance are the main contribution of the paper. Another contribution is the comparison of these solutions with those proposed by other graph-based tools.
GraBaTs08
MOLA.vdi
Description: none
GraBaTs08
Progres.vdi
Description: none
GraBaTs08
v2AGG.vdi
Description: In this paper, we focus on the Conference Scheduling System, a case study at the Tool Contest of Graph-Based Tools (GraBaTs) 2008. We took part in the contest with our graph transformation tool AGG and the Eclipse-based EMF model transformation tool EMF Tiger. We present the features of both tools and evaluate their abilities to model the Conference Scheduling System and to deal with additional contest assignments like model instance generation, property verification, and interoperability.
GraBaTs08
v2EMT.vdi
Description: In this paper, we focus on the Conference Scheduling System, a case study at the Tool Contest of Graph-Based Tools (GraBaTs) 2008. We took part in the contest with our graph transformation tool AGG and the Eclipse-based EMF model transformation tool EMF Tiger. We present the features of both tools and evaluate their abilities to model the Conference Scheduling System and to deal with additional contest assignments like model instance generation, property verification, and interoperability.
GraBaTs08
v2GrGen.NET.vdi
Description: GrGen.NET is a generative programming system for graph rewriting, transforming intuitive and expressive rewrite rule specifications into highly efficient .NET code. The user is supported by a convenient environment consisting of a graph viewer, an interactive shell with integrated debugging support, and an elegant domain-specific language for the combination of rewrite rules. After rapid prototyping with these tools, the resulting graph transformation programmes can be easily integrated into arbitrary .NET applications to serve as the algorithmic kernel. Expressiveness, convenience, and speed are exemplified by GrGen-solutions to the case studies AntWorld, Refactoring, and Conference Scheduling—besides others.
GraBaTs08
v2Kermeta.vdi
Description: Kermeta is a meta-language for specifying the structure and behavior of graphs of interconnected objects called models. In this paper, we show that Kermeta is relatively suitable for solving three graph-based problems. First, Kermeta allows the specification of generic model transformations such as refactorings that we apply to different metamodels including Ecore, Java, and Uml. Second, we demonstrate the extensibility of Kermeta to the formal language Alloy using an inter-language model transformation. Kermeta uses Alloy to generate recommendations for completing partially specified models. Third, we show that the Kermeta compiler achieves better execution time and memory performance compared to similar graph-based approaches using a common case study. The three solutions proposed for those graph-based problems and their evaluation with Kermeta according to the criteria of genericity, extensibility, and performance are the main contribution of the paper. Another contribution is the comparison of these solutions with those proposed by other graph-based tools.
GraBaTs08
v2MoTMoT.vdi
Description: Reverse and roundtrip engineering have become important research topics in model driven engineering. In this paper, we report on the use of model-to-model transformer (MoTMoT), a tool for model transformation (Schippers et al. in Satellite of the second international conference on graph transformation, vol 127, issue 3, pp 5–16, 2004), for the realization of a number of refactoring operations; this was proposed as a case study at GraBaTs 2008. MoTMoT is based on the story driven modeling (SDM) language for graph rewriting; thus the refactorings modify a graph model derived from Java source code. Realizing the three refactorings proposed in the case study allows us to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the tool, but it also forces us to consider numerous issues that require the use of standard compliant mechanisms. The case study highlights the benefits of MoTMoT as a transformation engine. Among the advantages of MoTMoT, we may mention that MoTMoT does not depend on a particular modeling tool to represent transformations, and the input models may be produced by arbitrary UML tools, separately from MoTMoT. This is in contrast to other transformation tools which depend on a custom built modeling tool. Moreover, MoTMoT can easily be extended with new language features to improve its support for model transformation. The underlying transformation language, SDM, is based on a very powerful paradigm and is capable of expressing the preconditions and checks required by the case study. We also address other, more general challenges of this case study: conciseness, readability, maintainability, efficiency and scalability are important features for the implementation. MoTMoT turns out to be a robust tool that provides an answer to these challenges.
GraBaTs08
v2Progres.vdi
Description: none
GraBaTs08
v2Viatra.vdi
Description: As recent tool contests demonstrated graph transformation tools scale up to handle very large models for model transformations, thanks to recent advances in graph pattern matching techniques. In this paper, we assess the performance and capabilities of the Viatra2 model transformation framework by implementing the AntWorld case study of the GraBats 2008 graph transformation tool contest. First, we extend initial measurements carried out in Bergmann et al. (Proceedings of ICMT ’09, 2nd International Conference on Model Transformation, Springer, Berlin, 2009) to assess the effects of combining local search-based and incremental pattern matching strategies. Moreover, we also assess the performance characteristics of various language features of Viatra2 as well as the cost of certain model manipulation operations. We observe by experimentation how Viatra2 can scale up to large iteratively growing model sizes and focus on execution time and memory consumption. We believe that the results obtained from the benchmark example can set the course for further performance enhancement of Viatra2 and other future model transformation frameworks.
GraBaTs08
Viatra.vdi
Description: As recent tool contests demonstrated graph transformation tools scale up to handle very large models for model transformations, thanks to recent advances in graph pattern matching techniques. In this paper, we assess the performance and capabilities of the Viatra2 model transformation framework by implementing the AntWorld case study of the GraBats 2008 graph transformation tool contest. First, we extend initial measurements carried out in Bergmann et al. (Proceedings of ICMT ’09, 2nd International Conference on Model Transformation, Springer, Berlin, 2009) to assess the effects of combining local search-based and incremental pattern matching strategies. Moreover, we also assess the performance characteristics of various language features of Viatra2 as well as the cost of certain model manipulation operations. We observe by experimentation how Viatra2 can scale up to large iteratively growing model sizes and focus on execution time and memory consumption. We believe that the results obtained from the benchmark example can set the course for further performance enhancement of Viatra2 and other future model transformation frameworks.
GraBaTs08
VMTS.vdi
Description: Model-based development is one of the most promising solutions for several problems of industrial software engineering. Graph transformation is a proven method for processing domain-specific models. However, in order to be used by domain experts without graph transformation experts, it must be fast even if not tweaked for speed manually based on knowledge available only to the implementers of the transformation system. In this paper, we compare the performance of such manual optimizations with a solution using automated optimization based on sharing of matches between overlapping left-hand-sides of sequentially independent rules. This yields a 11% improvement in our scenario, although our prototypical implementation only exploits overlapping between, at most, two rules, and the analyzed benchmark does not contain many cases where the optimization is applicable.
GraBaTs08
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